India

More than 99 per cent of crimes registered under POCSO Act in 2020 were against girls: NCRB data

By PTI

New Delhi: According to NCRB data, more than 99 per cent of crimes registered under the POCSO Act in 2020 were against girls, which shows that girl child is one of the most vulnerable sections of the society.

An analysis of the latest NCRB data by NGO Child Rights and You (CRY) revealed that out of 28,327 children who were victims of crimes registered under the POCSO Act, 28,058 were girls.

An in-depth analysis of cases registered under the Protection of Children from Sexual Offenses (POCSO) Act revealed that crimes against juvenile girls in the age group of 16 to 18 were the highest at 14,092, followed by girls in the age group of 12 to 16 years. There were 10,949 offences. Group.

Although both boys and girls are almost equally victims of abuse, NRCB data shows that girls of all age groups are more vulnerable to sexual offenses than boys.

On the occasion of International Day of the Girl Child on Monday, CRY said girls are being celebrated across the world and a lot is being said about their rights, but they are one of the most vulnerable sections of the society as per NCRB data. . .

According to the latest data released by the National Crime Records Bureau (NCRB) last month, more than 99 per cent of crimes under the Protection of Children from Sexual Offenses Act in 2020 were against girls.

Preeti Mahara, director of policy research and advocacy at CRY, said the recent trend of girls bearing the brunt of crimes against children should not be viewed in isolation.

“It is important to understand that along with security challenges, aspects related to education, social security, poverty, etc. also play an important role in the empowerment of the girl child; and in assessing the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic. These Parameters are equally important,” she said.

“During the crisis, girls face many vulnerabilities.” Their access to education becomes more restricted and they become more vulnerable to the risks of child marriage.

They are more likely to experience violence and sexual abuse in many forms and degrees,” Mahara said.

Emphasizing on the emerging need for a strong child protection mechanism, Mahara said that in the last few years, some progress has been made in terms of girls’ education and strengthening child protection systems, but the pandemic has derailed the development .

Since the vulnerability has now increased manifold, the chances of girls dropping out of the education system and falling from the safety safety-net have equally increased, he said.

Mahara said girls, especially those in their teens, face many safety risks during and after any humanitarian crisis.

“Given the immediate and long-term risks arising out of the COVID-19 pandemic, the need of the hour is to strengthen gender-responsive protection interventions and ensure that these are fully implemented,” he said.

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